ELL/Immigrant Students and Families

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Welcome to the Weymouth Public Schools! The Weymouth Public School System has a diverse student population. We service students from various countries around the world. Including, but not limited to, Brazil, India, Guatemala, China, El Salvador, Syria, Mexico, Albania, Pakistan, Spain, Vietnam, The Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cape Verde, Egypt, Morocco, Iraq, Iceland, and Lebanon. We, also, support many students who are native to the United States and speak another language at home. Our English Language Education (ELE) program educates our English Learners through Sheltered English Immersion (SEI). In our SEI program, all K-12 classroom instruction, books, and instructional materials are in English. Additionally, all subject matter is taught in English. Our teachers provide intent instruction in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, connected to grade-level content standards. Weymouth Public Schools ELE program is committed to helping students achieve English proficiency as quickly as possible, develop academic and social skills, while concurrently valuing their native language and cultures. 

 

During registration, any student who indicates any languages other than English is spoken at home will be screened to determine if the student would benefit from English language support. Based on this screening, students who identify as needing ELL services will be placed in the proper ELL class based on their English proficiency level.

Click here for Important Updates

 

Contacts

Administrative Staff

 
Melanie Curtin 
District Director of ELL Services 
(781) 335-1460 ext. 20325
 
Molly Louzan
District ELL Program Facilitator 
(781) 335-4717 ext. 30214

 

ELL Teachers

 

Academy Avenue Primary School 
ELL Teacher: Molly Louzan 
(781) 335-4717 ext. 30209

 
Frederick C. Murphy Primary School 
ELL Teacher: Iris Mehagen 
(781) 335-2862 ext. 33121
 
 
Ralph Talbot Primary School 
ELL Teacher: Katy Daigler 
781-335-7250 xt 37110

 
Thomas W. Hamilton Primary School 
ELL Teacher: Meredith Carroll 
(781) 335-2122 ext. 31135

 
William Seach Primary School 
 ELL Teacher: Jennifer O'Brien Magaw
Jennifer O’Brien Magaw (781) 335-7589 ext. 36122
 
 ELL Teacher: Paula Hayes 
Paula Hayes (781) 335-7589 ext. 36202
 
ELL Support Staff: Paloma Fernandes

 
Weymouth Middle School Adams Campus 
ELL Teacher: Shauna Stock
(781) 335-1100 ext. 28159
 
Weymouth Middle School Adams Campus 
ELL Teacher: Olivia Morrell 
Building is currently closed 

 
Weymouth High School 
ELL Teacher: Meredith Westfall 
(781) 337-7500 ext. 23041
 
Weymouth High School 
ELL Teacher: Olivia Morrell 
(781) 337-7500 ext. 23041
 

Our Schools 

 

 

United States School Norms 

 
Age 5 years to 18 years: K-12 U.S. educators frequently use the terms K-12 education to refer to all primary and secondary education, from Kindergarten prior to the first year (or 1st grade) of formal schooling, through secondary graduation (12th Grade). One of the following four patterns usually prevails in the community:  Elementary school (K-5), middle school (6-8), high school (9-12); 
 
U.S. children enter formal schooling around age 5. The first pattern (see above) is the most common one. Elementary students are typically in one classroom with the same teacher most of the day. After elementary school, students proceed to junior high school (also called middle school), where they usually move from class to class each period, with a new teacher and a new mixture of students in every class. Students can select from a wide range of academic classes and elective classes. During both Elementary and Middle School (or Junior High), children generally stay in the classroom an average of 6.5 to 7 hours. 
 
In High School, students in their first year are called freshman, in their second year sophomore, in their third year junior, and in their last and fourth year senior. There is an even greater variety of subjects than before. Students generally stay in the classroom an average of 7.5 hours and must earn a certain number of credits (which they get for a successfully completed course) in order to graduate and be awarded a high school diploma; there is no final examination like in many other countries. 

 
Separation of State and Religion 
The US constitution requires the separation of state and religion and forbids religious observance in public schools, but in some schools children are still expected to participate in the ritual morning pledge of allegiance to the American flag in many schools (although the words ‘under God’ are optional).
 
Parental Involvement
 An aspect of the US education system is the high degree of parental involvement. ‘Parent power’ isn’t only accepted, but is welcomed and encouraged through local Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) attached to every school. We also have an English Learners Parent Advisory Council that we suggest you join. PTA and ELPAC meet regularly and concern themselves with many aspects of a school’s affairs including the curriculum, facilities, school hours and after-school activities and programs. Parents are encouraged to attend meetings and show an interest in the school and their children’s education (it’s also a good way for newcomers to make friends). Schools organize parent days, ‘back to school’ nights and parent-teacher conferences, where parents can meet teachers and examine their child’s school timetable. 

Individual Responsibility 
Individual responsibility has an important place in the American value system. This value is taught to children from a young age. For example, beginning from kindergarten, each year students are given a handbook that outlines the details of the school’s policies and procedures, and the consequences for violating them. The handbook includes policies on Hazing, Personal Possessions, and Harassment, and is designed to help parents and students understand the district’s guidelines for acceptable behavior in all of these areas. BOTH parents and students are expected to read it and sign a form attesting they are aware of their rights and responsibilities. Many teachers also ask students to sign a handout detailing policies and procedures to follow in their classes. 

 
Attendance Policy 
 
Elementary & Middle School: 
Students should be present in school everyday at the school start time. If your student is sick, parents should notify the school office. If your student is sick and seeing a doctor, please ask the doctor for a note to the school stating that they were sick. Failure to attend school for a student under the age of 16, will result in a “CRA” (child requiring assistance). This will place the child with a school resource officer. If the student still does not attend school, the family will be legally required to attend court to discuss the situation. 
 
High School: 
Students should be present in school everyday at the school start time. If your student is sick, parents should notify the school office. If your student is sick and seeing a doctor, please ask the doctor for a note to the school stating that they were sick. Failure to attend school for a student under the age of 16, will result in a “CRA” (child requiring assistance). This will place the child with a school resource officer. If the student still does not attend school, the family will be legally required to attend court to discuss the situation. ATTENDANCE POLICY AT WHS- if a student is absent in a class more than four times, they will fail the course due to poor attendance.